Prof Douglas Hartley

Consultant ENT Surgeon

MBBS (Distinction) DPhil (Oxford University) FRCS (ORL-HNS)

Clinical Interests

  • Ear, Nose and Throat conditions in adults
  • Hearing loss
  • Chronic ear disease and cholesteatoma
  • Ear surgery, including grommets, mastoidectomy, bone-anchored hearing aids and cochlear implants
  • Balance problems and dizziness
  • Tonsil and adenoid problems
  • Nose and sinus problems
  • Throat problems

Professional Memberships

  • British Cochlear Implant Group
  • British Association of Otolaryngologists – Head and Neck Surgeons
  • British Society of Otology
  • Royal College of Surgeons

  • Personal profile

    Professor Hartley is a highly experienced Ear, Nose and Throat consultant surgeon with an international reputation in the field of ear surgery (Otology). He is the only ENT Professor at the University of Nottingham, and he is the surgical lead for the Nottingham Auditory Implant program at the Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.

    Professor Hartley is very experienced in the assessment and management of a wide range of ear, nose, throat and head and neck conditions in adults, and he receives private referrals locally and from across the UK, including referrals from other healthcare specialists and ENT surgeons for complex surgery.
    Professor Hartley has a specialist interest in conditions of the ear, including hearing and balance disorders. This includes cholesteatoma, cochlear implants, middle ear implants, bone-anchored hearing aids, ossiculoplasty, Ménière's disease, Vestibular migraines, Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), perforated ear drum, otosclerosis, glue ear, tinnitus, hyperacusis, ear infections and ear microsuction.

    Professor Hartley completed his medical training and qualified with distinction from Newcastle University Medical School in 1995. During his subsequent training in Oxford, he undertook pioneering research in the fields of glue ear and cochlear implantation and was awarded a PhD (DPhil) from Oxford University in 2001. He worked as a Clinical Lecturer in ENT Surgery at the world famous John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford and was fortunate to be the first recipient of a Welcome Trust Clinician Scientist Fellowship in ENT surgery: the second recipient across any surgical specialty.

    He spent time as a Surgical Fellow at the Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre, after becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS ORL-HNS) in 2009 and completing his higher surgical training at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. Part of his training included working under world renowned Otologists, Rhinologists and sinus surgeons as well as Head and Neck cancer Surgeons.

    Professor Hartley is currently an ENT Professor at The University of Nottingham and his groundbreaking research at the National Institute for Health Research Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre is developing novel tools to monitor the effects of deafness and hearing restoration on the ear and the brain to improve treatment outcomes. Professor Hartley’s work has been widely published in high impact international scientific journals and he has contributed to over £30 million in grant funding. Professor Hartley regularly lectures on his translational work involves bringing technology into clinical practice in the UK and around the world.

    During the COVID19 pandemic, Prof. Hartley developed a novel form of personal protective equipment (PPE) for cochlear implant surgery that was adopted around the world, giving hundreds of deaf children worldwide the chance to hear. This breakthrough was reported in national newspapers and on radio and television news. Professor Hartley is also heavily involved in postgraduate teaching and training, and he runs a prestigious Fellowship for ENT surgeons in training. Professor Hartley recently received the Royal Society of Medicine’s award for the best work in Otology.

    Professor Hartley serves on the translational grant review committee for the Royal National Institute for the Deaf and reviews papers for several international journals. His research team at the University of Nottingham works in association with the MRC Institute for Hearing Research and the National Biomedical Research Centre.
     
    Professor Hartley grew up in a small village in Hampshire and now lives in a small Leicestershire village with his wife and three daughters. Whist at Oxford Professor Hartley rowed for the Christ Church college 1st VIII crew and rowed in the 1999 Henley Royal Regatta. These days Professor Hartley prefers to relax by running across country fields accompanied by his two golden retriever dogs.

     

    Year qualified:

    1995