Skip to main content

Hernia Surgery

Hernias are a common medical problem which can usually be quickly, easily, and expertly treated by our clinicians

A hernia is the protrusion of a piece of tissue or organ through another wall of tissue.

It is often a part of your intestine pushing through the wall of muscle around your groin and lower abdominal cavity, or your stomach moving upwards through the hole in your diaphragm (hiatus).

According to the NHS, the exact cause of a hernia is not clear: “It's not exactly clear what causes hiatus hernias, but it may be the result of the diaphragm becoming weak with age or pressure on the tummy.

Although the cause of a hernia is unclear, it is known that hernias can be extremely painful and make day-to-day life a challenge.

Find out more about the causes and treatments of hernias on our hernia information hub.

Inguinal Hernia

An inguinal hernia occurs in 27% of men and 3% of women. Inguinal hernias occur when a piece of the intestine pokes through a weakness in the muscle wall from an opening in the diaphragm. There are two sub-types of inguinal hernia.

The indirect inguinal hernia occurs predominantly in the young and physically active. This type of hernia can only be fixed by inguinal hernia surgery.

The direct inguinal hernia occurs predominantly in individuals aged over 50 years old. This, too, can be fixed by inguinal hernia surgery or by the use of a hernia belt.

Although we do not know exactly causes inguinal hernias, there are clear risk factors associated it its development.

These hernias are caused by a number of factors. A build-up of pressure within the abdomen can push a piece of the intestine through a weak spot in the abdominal muscle. This pressure can vary from prolonged constipation, swelling of your internal organs (such as the bowels themselves), obesity, or ascites (fluid build-up in the abdomen). Likewise, pregnancy can cause inguinal hernias in the mother for the same reason.

Having a premature birth means that often your muscle wall is underdeveloped. This makes you more prone to developing inguinal hernias throughout your life, as often the muscle wall does not fully correct itself throughout your life.

Cystic fibrosis can also be associated with the development of an inguinal hernia, but this is most likely due to the life-long symptom of heavy coughing associated with cystic fibrosis.

Engaging in heavy lifting, such as in the gym, in your workplace, or at home, can increase the risk of developing an inguinal hernia. Here, it is important to comply with situational instructions and making sure you take it easy when engaging in these risky activities.

Long-term, chronic, or heavy coughs can shock your intestine into pushing through a weak-spot in your abdomen.

Inguinal hernias have a number of symptoms which can be particularly uncomfortable as they are around the groin. Notably, a bulge will appear around the pubic bone. This bulge, which may become prominent as more intestine bulges through.

This bulge may cause a burning sensation and aches around the area, as the muscles are pushed aside by the piece of intestine. The pain may get worse when you cough, move your hips around, or shift your body weight from standing to bending over, or when lifting objects. This pain varies from dull to sharp, and it dependent on the individual in question.

Men may experience pain in their testicles as the loose piece of intestine moves into the scrotal sack. Likewise, for women, there may be a heaviness around the groin and pelvic area.

There may be the experience of weakness in the side of your groin which has the hernia. This may get worse as time progresses.

Hiatal Hernia

A hiatal hernia occurs in both sexes equally, but mainly in individuals aged over 50 years old. Unlike other hernias, this condition occurs when part of the stomach pushes through the diaphragm.

There are two types of hiatal hernia.

Sliding hiatal hernias slide in and out of a hole in the diagram which connects with the oesophagus. They slide in and out whenever there is swallowing, as the muscles pull and push the stomach out of cavity above the diaphragm. These do not tend to cause serious symptoms and can be treated with over-the-counter Proton Pump Inhibitors.

Rolling/Giant (or para-oesophageal) hiatal hernias push out of the membrane between the oesophagus and the diaphragm. These occur in only 10% of hiatal hernia cases, but can be related to the sliding hernias. The fattier, larger side of stomach is more susceptible to the movements of the muscles around the oesophagus. These movements may cause the stomach to be pulled all the up and through the diaphragm, which requires immediate surgery.

A hiatal hernia has different symptoms, primarily related to the activity of the stomach. Individuals with a hiatal hernia tend to experience acid reflux, heartburn (which can get worse when you sit or lie down, as the stomach moves), gaseousness, pain in the left side of the ribcage, difficulty swallowing food or spittle, and trouble swallowing. Individuals with Hiatal Hernias often also have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which a severe development of acid reflux. This can be highly uncomfortable, and makes treatment for a hiatal hernia all the more pressing.

Individuals are most at risk of hiatal hernias if they are obese, as this causes strain on the diaphragm due to the excess weight that your body struggles to deal with. Other risks include age, as the structural integrity of the diaphragm degrades as you age, meaning you are more prone to a wider hiatus. Congenital underdevelopment of the hiatus and general diaphragm also predisposes individuals to developing a hiatal hernia.

Individuals are also at risk of developing a hiatal hernia if they undertake heavy lifting or have pressure exerted on the oesophagus from regular vomiting, chronic heavy coughing, and excessive exercise. All of these cause damage to the diaphragm and the can cause a wider opening of the hiatus.

Femoral Hernia

A femoral hernia occurs predominantly in women. This is commonly called a groin hernia. Femoral hernias occur when a piece if intestine pokes through a weakness in the femoral canal, around the groin and abominable wall, where the femoral artery has more space to move. This can be fixed by femoral hernia surgery.

Femoral hernias, like inguinal hernias, can develop from stresses and strains on the intestines and on the femoral canal.

A build-up of pressure within the abdomen can push a piece of the intestine into the femoral canal. This pressure can vary from prolonged constipation, swelling of your internal organs (such as the bowels themselves), obesity, or ascites (fluid build-up in the abdomen). Likewise, pregnancy can cause inguinal hernias in the mother for the same reason.

Straining on the toilet, whether for passing a stool or urinating, can force the intestine to pop out of the femoral canal. Likewise, if you are giving birth, the likelihood of a femoral hernia developing increases as the pressure on the lower abdomen grows.

Engaging in heavy lifting, such as in the gym, in your workplace, or at home, can increase the risk of developing a femoral hernia. Here, it is important to comply with situational instructions and making sure you take it easy when engaging in these risky activities.

Long-term, chronic, or heavy coughs can shock your intestine into pushing through a weak-spot around your femoral canal.

It is important to have a femoral hernia treated quickly, as there is a high risk of it becoming strangulated and rupturing within your femoral canal. This is because of the position of the femoral artery, around your groin and leg joint. Likewise, a femoral hernia can block the femoral canal, making blood flow through the artery more difficult.

Other Hernias:

Epigastric Hernia

Epigastric hernias are common in all ages, but are quite rare. This hernia is mostly made up of fatty tissue, forced into a lump by a piece of intestine which has pushed through a weak spot between the muscles in the centre of the chest.

Epigastric hernias present a number of symptoms. Most significantly, the hernia will cause a swelling or bump in the middle of the chest area (sternum). This bump may or may not be painful, but it can cause nausea and general abdominal pain, particularly around the hernia itself. This nausea is caused by the hernia causing a disturbance to the intestine’s function.

This pain can be a burning or aching sensation, which may progressively get more painful as time goes on and the hernia remain untreated. This pain is caused by the muscles being forced apart abnormally, hence the burning and aching sensation.

The pain and hernia itself can be made worse by chronic conditions such as coughing and straining on the toilet. This is because as your muscles contract, whether it is forcing your abdomen to cough or push out a stool, it pushes in on the gut and strains the muscles further. This can cause more of the hernia to develop and also increase the amount of pain.

Umbilical Hernias

Umbilical Hernias mostly occur in infants and children. These hernias are usually caused by a failure of the umbilical cord and naval to close after birth, but these hernias often naturally repair after a couple of months. If not, they can be treated by abdominal surgery.

The primary causes for these hernias are similar. For example, if your mother had multiple pregnancies before your birth, there is an increased likelihood of a failure to develop the inguinal canal during growth in the womb. This means that an umbilical hernia is more likely to develop. Similarly, a premature birth means that the abdominal wall is more likely to be underdeveloped.

Obesity can heighten the risk of umbilical hernias. Due to the increased abdominal pressure from the build-up of fat around the belly button, it can force the intestine out around the weakened muscles of the abdominal wall. This can occur both in young children and later in life.

Umbilical hernias have a number of symptoms. These include a bloated abdomen accompanied by a general soreness and pain around the hernia. If the hernia is large, then the pain will be extended out generally across the stomach area. Redness will also be a symptom around the herniated area.

The pain and discomfort can also lead to nausea. In children, this hernia may also lead to behavioural changes in eating or drinking. Fever can be a symptom in both adults and children resulting from this hernia.

Sports Hernia

Sports Hernias (or athletic pubalgia) is common in sports players. It is caused by excessive twisting, rapid and shock motions, such as impacts, over-stretches, and sudden movements. It is most common in sportsmen who play golf, rugby, cricket, skiing, running, and track and field events. This is because the movements that require sportspeople to perform here rely on tendons and softer tissue which can be easily torn or injured during such exercises. When a sportsperson engages in these activities, the worn out tissues will not stop a piece of intestine from pushing through around the groin area.

The symptoms of a sports hernia are less apparent than other hernias. Sports hernias generally cause swelling and pain in the affected area. This can be made worse by sudden movements associated with the above described sports.

The lack of apparent symptoms in sports hernias means that they can easily develop into inguinal hernias, which do have more apparent symptoms. However, if you suspect that you have an inguinal hernia, you may be diagnosed by MRI or ultra-sound, where our experienced clinicians can quickly diagnose whether or not you have a sports hernia.

Incisional Hernia

An incisional hernia occurs when a previous surgery around the groin and abdomen has left weakness in the abdominal cavity. The intestine will protrude through this weakness, primarily around sutures and previous scarring. This is a common occurrence, with around 15% of previous abdominal surgery patients developing an incisional hernia on average.

After surgery, the sutures and weakened tissue around the scar are susceptible to being pushed out of the way by a piece of the intestine. This means the hernia can create more damage around the scar, which means it should be treated soon after developing.

The symptoms for an incisional hernia are many and varied, as it depends where the incision occurred. But the following are general symptoms.

Discomfort, a burning sensation, or aching around the old incisional and occurring hernia are almost universal symptoms. This is often paired with fever and nausea. In some cases, constipation or diarrhoea can occur if the incision is around the lower abdomen, alongside the thinning in consistency of stools.

General bloating around the area of in the incision can be a symptom of an incisional hernia, alongside other symptoms.

Stomatic Hernia

A stomatic hernia occurs when a piece of the intestine is pushed through the weakened abdominal wall around the stoma. As the stoma is attached by muscles to the abdominal wall, but these can detach or weaken over time, which creates the hernia.

The symptoms of this hernia vary. Mostly, the hernia causes discomfort and can be seen to be swelling around the stoma. This can be made worse by the filling of the ostomy bag, which can pull down on the stoma and therefore on the hernia itself. The hernia can also make keeping the ostomy bag in place and the barrier properly sealed. This is a matter of concern, as it may increase leakages. Therefore, you would see your doctor about the development of a stomatic hernia.

The causes of a stomatic hernia are varied. Engaging in heavy lifting, such as in the gym, in your workplace, or at home, can increase the risk of developing a stomatic hernia. Here, it is important to comply with situational instructions and making sure you take it easy when engaging in these risky activities.

Long-term, chronic, or heavy coughs can shock your intestine into pushing through this already weakened area of muscle, causing the hernia to progressively develop.

Prolonged constipation can cause stomatic hernias to develop. This straining, as with other hernia conditions, causes the weakness behind the stoma to be exploited. This pushes a piece of the intestine between the muscles and tendons which attach the stoma to the abdominal wall, and therefore creates a hernia.

Nutritional deficiencies can create the conditions for a stomatic hernia to develop. This chronic condition can further weaken the muscles that hold the stoma firmly in place on the abdominal wall. This allows a piece of intestine to push through the gap created and develop into a hernia. Your clinician or pharmacist can further advise on which vitamins, minerals, or nutrients need replenishing in order to counter this risk.

Obesity can heighten the risk of stomatic hernias. Due to the increased abdominal pressure from the build-up of fat around and above the stoma, it can force the intestine out around the weakened muscles that attach the stoma to the abdominal wall. A further danger of obesity is that it can cause a detachment of the muscles that join the stoma to the abdominal wall. This is because of the overstretching force of the excessive fat has on the stoma. Paired with the above malnutrition, as obesity is often a side-effect of malnutrition, this can be a serious cause of stomatic hernias.

When the stoma is created in surgery, sometimes an infection may develop which weakens the muscles around the stoma. This infection will either erode the muscles to the point where a hernia develops conventionally, or the muscles are moved away from behind the stoma, making space for the hernia to develop.

Likewise, as time progresses, a stoma will progressively get worn out. This also means that the muscles behind the stoma will weaken. This could be made worse by the aforementioned sports and work-related activities, meaning that a hernia is more likely to develop.

Often, a hernia is just a medical fault that we are born with. This means that little can be done to prevent one, as our muscles have already formed in a way that either stops or allows a hernia to develop.

For the most part, hernias are not dangerous. The Royal College of Surgeons recommends that even if a hernia shows no pain or discomfort (asymptomatic), you should see a clinician to have it checked out. This is because hernias can lose their blood supply (become a strangulated hernia) over time and become acutely dangerous. This causes ischemia and can cause permanent, if not fatal, damage. So it’s best to have your hernia checked out as early as possible.

Hernias can become irreducible, which means that it is hard to push them back into your chest cavity. This is the stage before the hernia becomes strangulated, and it is here that seeing your doctor becomes very important.

You can tell whether a hernia is getting dangerous when you cannot push it back into your body, when you have difficulty passing wind or you have difficulty passing bowel movements, when you feel continuously nauseous, or when there is sudden bouts of intense pain around the affected area. If any of these occur, you should go to Accident and Emergency.

These conditions are associated with a strangulated hernia. This is when the muscles have hardened or are not so able to allow the piece of hernia to be pushed back into the abdominal cavity. When this happens, the piece of intestine loses blood supply, either through strangulation or a rupturing of the blood vessels within this piece of your organ. This condition can be life threatening and you need to go to Accident & Emergency immediately.

How Is An Incisional Hernia Treated?

An incisional hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the groin and lower abdomen using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. Using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the incisional hernia back into the abdominal cavity, and cover it in a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out again. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

Risks associated with incisional hernia surgery are generally uncommon, however, they still exist. Indeed, they are more common in older individuals than younger individuals. Your consultant will advise you on the following risks: general surgical difficulties, such as blood clots, damage to your internal organs, nerve damage, scarring, and infections from the wound. More pertinent to incisional hernia surgery is that there may be difficulty passing stools after the surgery, as well as temporary weakness around the groin and central muscles of your abdomen.

How Is A Femoral Hernia Treated?

A femoral hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the groin using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. Using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the femoral hernia out of the femoral canal and back into the abdominal cavity, and cover it in a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out again. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

Risks associated with femoral hernia surgery are generally uncommon, however, they still exist. Indeed, they are more common in older individuals than younger individuals. Your consultant will advise you on the following risks: general surgical difficulties, such as blood clots, damage to your internal organs, nerve damage, scarring, and infections from the wound. More pertinent to femoral hernia surgery is that there may be difficulty passing urine or stools after the surgery, as well as temporary weakness around the leg joint and muscles down the leg.

How Is An Epigastric Hernia Treated?

An epigastric hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the sternum using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. Using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the fatty tissue back into its normal place, and push the piece of intestine back into the abdominal cavity, and cover it in a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out again. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

How Is An Umbilical Hernia Treated?

An umbilical hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment. The surgery will differ from patient to patient, especially dependent on the age of the patient. In children, the surgery can be more difficult owing to the physiological weakness of the patient when compared to older patients.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the belly button using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. Using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the hernia back into the body and cover it in a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery. However, as mentioned, this surgery can differ owing to the age of the patient. Your clinician can make more specific advice for your treatment.

How Is A Sports Hernia Treated?

A hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. Using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the hernia back into the body and cover it in a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

How Is A Hiatal Hernia Treated?

A hiatal hernia can generally have its symptoms treated by antacids and anti-acid reflux treatments (Proton Pump Inhibitors), as well as treatments that reduce stomach acid production and create a healthy environment for your oesophagus to heal.

The only way to reverse a hiatal hernia is through surgery. However, this is not always necessary and should only be done in the case of the hernia becoming dangerous or the symptoms being irreducible. Primarily, surgery is reserved for the rolling hernia if it is symptomatic or poses a risk of strangulation, which can often be sudden and fatal. A rolling hernia treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the incisional hernia using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. The stomach will be stapled to the inner abdominal wall or wrapped around the lower oesophagus, which will stop it from coming up and popping through the diaphragm. Sometimes, your surgeon may choose to close your hiatus (the hole in the diaphragm for your oesophagus) in order to better prevent strangulation.

How Is An Incisional Hernia Treated?

An incisional hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the incisional hernia using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. The surgeons will remove previous scar tissue and clear any debris build up. Then, using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the incisional hernia back into the abdominal cavity, reinforce the incision with a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out again. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

Surgeons will avoid using sutures, as these are prone to splitting. Rather, surgeons will use an applicator glue to ensure that your previous scar is closed and the skin is secured over the mesh, whilst also ensuring that the incision is secured against a recurring hernia.

Risks associated with an incisional hernia repair include internal organ damage, a build-up of fluid below where the surgery took place (seroma), and some clotting within the incision. All of this, however, can be latterly treated by your highly skilled and well experienced clinicians.

How Is A Stomatic Hernia Treated?

A stomatic hernia can be generally treated by surgery, either in open surgery or with key-hole surgery (laparoscopically). Generally, surgeons prefer key-hole surgery as it is quicker, less invasive, and means you can recover quicker. The time between diagnosis and private hernia surgery is often less than a month, ensuring you receive rapid and world-class treatment.

Our laparoscopic surgery requires a few small incisions around the stoma using a machine controlled by experienced and highly skilled clinicians. You will be placed under general anaesthetic for the procedure. The surgeons will remove previous scar tissue and clear any debris build up. Then, using a lightweight, synthetic mesh, our surgeons push the incisional hernia back into the abdominal cavity, reinforce the incision with a lightweight synthetic mesh which strengthens the abdominal wall, preventing the hernia from popping out again. This technique is referred to as an umbrella hernia repair. Previous patients who have received this treatment with the mesh have recommended it rather than a manual pulling of the muscles together to heal the weakness, which can be more intrusive. This less invasive surgery takes 45 minutes from start to finish, and is a day-care case, meaning you can arrive and leave on the day of the surgery.

Surgeons may also choose to either reattach or create another stoma, depending on the damage caused by the hernia to the previous stoma. This will be discussed with you before surgery by your clinician. Otherwise, your surgeon may choose to reinforce your stoma by reattaching the tendons which hold the stoma in place, reversing the damage caused by your hernia. This can be aided by careful application of the aforementioned meshes and applicator glues. All of this is done to ensure that you can soon return to your normal life as soon as possible.

Most hernia surgeries are day-cases owing to the minimally invasive surgical technique of laparoscopies. This means you will be able to go home on the day of the surgery, so long as you are supervised.

However, it may be advised that you remain in overnight for monitoring by our care team.

The full recovery time for hernia surgery is around 7 to 14 days.

You will be encouraged to move around and build up strength around the repaired area after you wake from surgery.

This is important to allow the hernia mesh to bind with the tissue and strengthen against the previously protruding piece of bowel.

Towards the end of the 14 days, you can resume normal activities and return to work.

However, your clinician will personalise your recovery plan to make it just right for you.

Specialists Offering Hernia surgery

Mr Abhiram Sharma

Consultant General & Colorectal Surgeon

MBBS, MD, FRCS

BMI The Alexandra Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Yuksel Gercek

Consultant General, Laparoscopic and Colorectal Surgeon

M.D. (Belgium), RBSS (Belgium)

BMI The Manor Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Rhys Thomas

Consultant General Surgeon

BSc, MBBS, FRCS (General Surgery)

BMI Shirley Oaks Hospital 2 more BMI The Sloane Hospital BMI The Blackheath Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Robin Gupta

Consultant General & Colorectal Surgeon

BSc (Hons), MBBS (Lon), FRCSEng (Gen), FRCSEd

BMI Thornbury Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Efthymios Ypsilantis

Consultant Laparoscopic General and Colorectal Surgeon

MBBS, ECFMG, MRCS, MSc, MPhil, FRCS, MS, FEBS

BMI The Blackheath Hospital 1 more BMI The Sloane Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Mark Peterson

Consultant Laparoscopic and HPB ( Liver Pancreas Biliary) Surgeon

MBChB FRCS

BMI Thornbury Hospital

View profile Book online

View all

Ways to pay

credit card

Pay for yourself

Pay for yourself with our fixed price packages. This includes your pre-assessment, treatment, follow-ups and 6 months' aftercare

Find out more

insurance

Pay with health insurance

We are widely recognised by health insurers. Ask your insurer about your cover and for an insurer pre-authorisation code

Find out more

direct debit

Spread the cost

Pay for yourself with the BMI card and spread the cost over 12 months, interest-free (terms and conditions apply)

Find out more

General Enquiries