Arthroscopic Latarjet

What is arthroscopic latarjet and how does it work?

An arthroscopic latarjet is a procedure to treat anterior shoulder instability.  

Often a soft tissue repair is not effective especially when there is some bone loss from the front of the glenoid, and in these cases a bone-block stabilisation procedure known as the Latarjet procedure is required.

The Latarjet procedure involves transfer of the coracoid with the attached conjoint tendon to the deficient area over the front of the glenoid. This replaces the missing bone and the transferred muscle acts as an additional muscular strut preventing further dislocations. 

The procedure has a high success rate but up to now was performed only through open surgery.

What will happen during my arthroscopic latarjet consultation?

When you meet with your consultant surgeon they'll ensure that you have the opportunity to ask any questions you may have about your arthroscopic latarjet, they'll discuss with you what'll happen before, during and after the procedure and any pain you might have. Take this time with your consultant surgeon to ensure your mind is put at rest.

What are the benefits of arthroscopic latarjet?

An all-arthroscopic technique combines the advantages of the open procedure whilst using a minimally invasive technique.

Any other associated intra-articular pathology can be treated during the same arthroscopic procedure.

Is arthroscopic latarjet a risky procedure?

The risk of adhesions and shoulder stiffness is less with the arthroscopic technique and postoperatively there is less pain, earlier mobility, quicker rehabilitation and faster return to sports.

An arthroscopic technique offers also an improved cosmetic result.

 

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