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Vasectomy reversal

The aim of vasectomy reversal is to allow sperm to mix with your semen, making you fertile again. You can book an appointment for a vasectomy reversal with BMI online or by calling 0141 3005009.

What is a vasectomy reversal?

A vasectomy involves cutting both the tubes (vas deferens) that carry sperm from your testicles. Reversing a vasectomy is a procedure to rejoin the tubes. Reversing a vasectomy can fail, even if the tubes are rejoined.

What are the benefits of surgery?

The aim of rejoining the tubes is to allow sperm to mix with your semen, making you fertile again.

Are there any alternatives to surgery?

You may want to consider using donor sperm, either from someone you know or from a sperm bank. 

What does the procedure involve?

Using a technique called artificial insemination, your doctor will inject the sperm into your partner’s womb or near the neck of her womb. The sperm then fertilises her egg in the normal way.

It is possible for your doctor to take sperm from one of your testicles using a needle (sperm aspiration). In the laboratory, a single sperm can be injected directly into one of your partner’s eggs.

The operation is performed under a general anaesthetic and usually takes an hour to 90 minutes.

Your surgeon will usually make two cuts, about 3 centimetres long, on each side of your scrotum. Your surgeon will examine each testicle before finding and freeing up the tubes, and removing any scar tissue. Your surgeon will use an operating microscope to stitch the ends of the tubes back together.

What complications can arise?

Like all surgical procedures, there are some levels of risks to consider. Some of these can be serious and can even cause death. However, you can speak to your doctor about the following general and specific complications that may worry you.

General complications of any operation

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Infection of the surgical site (wound) or in your scrotum

Specific complications of this operation

  • Long-term pain in your testicles
  • Reduced sperm count over time

How soon will I recover?

You should be able to go home the same day or the day after. However, you should not do strenuous exercise, like running and riding a bicycle, for five to seven days.

You should be able to return to work after about a week. If your work involves strenuous exercise, you may need to stay off work for up to 3 weeks. With regular exercise, you should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. However, before you start exercising, ask the healthcare team or your GP for advice.

Your doctor will ask you to give a sample of your semen after six to eight weeks. The sample will be tested to find out if there are any sperm. If is no sperm, it is unlikely that the operation will be a success.

Summary

Reversing a vasectomy is an operation to rejoin the tubes that carry sperm from your testicles. It may make you fertile again. To find out more, call us on 0808 101 0337.

Acknowledgements

Author: Mr John Lemberger FRCS

Illustrator: Medical Illustration Copyright © Nucleus Medical Art. All rights reserved. www.nucleusinc.com

Specialists offering Vasectomy reversal

Mr Vinod Nargund

Consultant Urologist

PhD, FRCS(Urol), FEBU

BMI The London Independent Hospital

View profile Book online

Mr Henry Andrews

Consultant Urological Surgeon

MBBS, FRCS, FRCSi, FRCS(Urol), FEBU, MBA

BMI The Saxon Clinic

View profile Book online

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